Thursday, April 26, 2012

World's Oldest Man Turns 115: Shares 2 Longevity Secrets




Over the past 30 years in the fitness industry, I have had everyone I work with eventually ask me to share my nutritional and longevity secrets.  There are people who pay a lot of money for the secrets to longevity (more than a few of them reside in Hollywood, no doubt); it is merely a dream for most of us to live past seventy and still have our wits about us.




 Jiroemon Kimura (featured on Reuters video here), a farmer from Kyoto, says the secret is simple: eat small portions. Perhaps there’s something to that, since Kimura just turned 115 years old yesterday.

Kimura credits his eating habits as a contributing factor to reaching such a milestone birthday, and scientists do believe that certain foods–and the way we eat them–can help us prolong life by keeping us disease-free and restoring our anti-oxidant level. According to Diseaseproof.com, the seven best foods for ensuring a long life are black raspberries, strawberries, blueberries, flax Seeds, green leafy vegetables, tomatoes, and broccoli sprouts. The list of foods to stay away from includes butter, french fries, doughnuts, and sausage.

Kimura is not only the oldest living person in the world, he’s also been verified as the third-oldest in history. When he received the news, he said he was “delighted beyond words“.

He also added, when asked about the reason for his extraordinarily long life, “I don’t know exactly…maybe it’s all thanks to the sun above me. I am always looking up towards the sky, that is how I am.”

Thursday, April 19, 2012

Omar Pinzón: Columbian Guns for London Gold



 Colombian swimmers broke 13 national records in the World Swimming Championship, seven by swimmer Omar Pinzon alone, plus two South American ones. This is significant improvement from the previous championship in Australia where only three were beat.  Colombian Olympic swimmer training in the U.S. with the USC and a former ! Living the dream! / Nadador Olimpico Colombiano!
(Left to right) Jairo:  Omar's Colombian Strength coach, Lee Brandon, CSCS (US Olympic Strength coach), Marcus Rogan(2Time Austrian Olympic silver Medalist), Omar Pinzon(South American Gold Medalist),  and David (Austrian Olympic Relay swimmer)

With less than 100 days left till London Olympics, the greatest athletes in the world are in the final, fine tuning preparations for the worlds greatest sports event.  The greatest athletes in the world seek out the top coaches/professionals, training aides and techniques as tools in their arsenal to blow away the competition.  Below, Omar Pinzon, Colombian World Cup Gold medal winner in the back stroke, sounds off:

At first when I was introduced to the Ab-inforcer Core Biofeedback Training System  through Markus Rogan (Austrian, 2 Time Olympic Silver Medalist), I thought it was an interesting way to work on your abdominals.

Training hard puts the spine at risk, and being an Olympic Athlete, we all have to train smarter and harder!   Markus recommended that I meet Lee to learn her "Spine Sparing Secrets,"and then that was when I realized the true potential of the AB-Inforcer Biofeedback Training system.

video

Since I started working with Lee and the Ab-Inforcer I have substantially improved my core strength and my back pains are virtually nonexistent now. I have improved in ways I never thought possible.

I enjoy working with the Ab-inforcer because I feel the difference in the way and the speed I move through the water. It really has made a difference in my athletic career.  I just won Gold in the South American Championships, and feel like I'm getting faster everyday!

I enjoy working with Lee because there is no one else out there with the knowledge and work with the Ab-inforcer and much less with the specific knowledge combining swimming with it.

I have felt an amazing change in my body position and the connection between my core and my extremities in the water.  Thank you Lee. I have learned so much and will continue to improve because of the work that is being done with her. 


Marcus, Lee and Omar



Omar Pinzón 

@omarpinzon

Colombian Olympic swimmer training in the U.S. with the USC and a former ! Living the dream! / Nadador Olimpico Colombiano!
Not where you stand. · http://on.fb.me/rUOkPz

Marcus Rogan
@mahrqoos
Austrian Olympic swimmer training in the U.S. #trogans and former 
#stanford Grad. 

Lee Brandon, CSCS, Olympic Strength coach
@LongDriveChamp



Omar Pinzón
Personal information
Full nameOmar Andrés Pinzón García
Nationality Colombia
BornJune 17, 1989 (age 22)
Bogotá, Colombia
Height1.85 m (6 ft 1 in)
Weight85 kg (190 lb)
Sport
SportSwimming
Stroke(s)Backstrokebutterflyindividual medley
ClubNautalius
College teamUniversity of Florida


Omar Andrés Pinzón García (born June 17, 1989) is a Colombian international swimmer. He competed at the 2004 Olympics in Athens, Greece and 2008 Olympics in Beijing, China. Pinzón attended college in the United States, where he swam for the University of Florida.
At the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, Pinzón finished in thirty-fifth place in the men's 200-meter backstroke. Pinzón competed at the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing in the 100 and 200-meter backstroke, the 200 and 400-meter individual medley, and the 200-meter butterfly. His best 2008 Olympic performance was in the 200-meter backstroke, where he placed seventeenth with a time of 1:59.11.[1]
Pinzón was born in BogotáDistrito Capital, Colombia. He attended the Bolles School in Jacksonville, Florida, and graduated from Gimnasio Britanico high school in Bogotá in 2005. Pinzón received an athletic scholarship to attend the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida, where he swam for coach Gregg Troy's Florida Gators swimming and diving team in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) competition from 2006 to 2010.[2] In his four-year Gator swimming career, Pinzón received twelve All-American honors.
Pinzón won his first gold medal at a Swimming World Cup in Singapore in 2011 in the 200m backstroke[3] Pinzón then won gold medals in Shanghai and Tokyo in the 200m backstroke[4]